A Right to the Indian City? Legal and Political claims over housing and urban space in India

August 5, 2020 | Mathew Idiculla

This paper examines the idea of the “Right to the City” as a theoretical concept,…

Re-Imagining Bail Decision Making: An analysis of Bail Practice in Karnataka & Recommendations for Reform

March 30, 2020

The study titled ‘Reimaging Bail Decision Making’ looks at bail decision making in trial courts in three districts in Karnataka – Bengaluru, Dharwad and Tumakuru. The research focuses on the courts, which are the primary site at which decisions on granting bail are made, to understand what guides the grant or non-grant of bail and what are the factors which decide whether bail is likely to be granted or not. These include the statutory basis for the offence, the nature of offence, its classification as bailable or non-bailable, the punishment prescribed and effective legal representation by lawyers.

Supreme Court Statistics Pack 2018

July 13, 2019

The Supreme Court Observer’s Statistics Pack 2018 (“Stat Pack”) is the first in an annual series that aims to collate, analyze and present a quantitative data overview of the work of the Supreme Court of India.

‘The primacy of the elected’

July 10, 2019 | Mathew Idiculla

CLPR associate Mathew Idiculla writes for the Hindu about argues that the rights of a legislative assembly of a Union Territory should be seen as an integral element of federalism and that the Supreme Court should affirm the primacy of the elected government.

Child Rights Trust v. Union of India

August 6, 2020 | Almas Shaikh

Child Rights Trust (a Bangalore based NGO working extensively in the area of Child Rights) and Ms. Neena Nayak (a child Rights advocate and activist) filed a Writ Petition seeking enforcement of Fundamental Rights, under Articles 14, 15, 19, 21, 21A, 39 and 47 of the Constitution, of migrant children and children of migrant families during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Petition seeks to ensure that migrant children and children of migrant workers are provided with proper living conditions, nutrition, health care/immunization, access to education and their protection. The Petition highlights that the lack of present-day assessment of the number and essential needs of migrant children, infants and pregnant and lactating women of migrant families has aggravated their vulnerabilities during the lockdown.

22nd

Oct 2019

The Legal Profession in Flux – The NLS experience: Legal education & what comes next

Venue Bangalore International Centre

Time 6:30-8:00pm

EBC has recently published a new book, An idea of a Law school – Ideas from the Law school edited by NR Madhava Menon, Murali Nellakantan, Sumeet Malik) on the NLSIU. The panel discussion will focus on ideas raised in the book.

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08th

Jun 2019

Crime Victimisation Survey Workshop | Azim Premji University

Venue Bangalore International Centre, CA Site, No. 7, 4th Main Rd, Stage 2, Domlur, Bengaluru, Karnataka 560071

Time 10 AM to 4:45 PM

On 8th June this Saturday, Prof. Sudhir Krishnaswamy will present on the Karnataka Crime Victim Survey at Azim Premji University's workshop on the same. Organised by their Centre for Constitutional and Legal System Reform, the workshop will involve 5 sessions on victimisation, safety, lessons to learn from and strategies for the future. 

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The Hindu

Bail protocol, standardisation needed to ease undertrial burden in prisons

June 2, 2020

The Hindu carried a story mentioning CLPR’s study, “Re-imagining bail decision making: An analysis of bail practice in Karnataka and recommendations for reform”. The study emphasizes that bail protocol needs to be standardized and the classification of offenses must be revisited for easing the burden of under-trial prisoners in India.

Mongabay

[Book Review] The stories of our roots

June 20, 2019

In a recent interview about their book, Harini Nagendra and Seema Mundoli speak of joined efforts with colleagues from CLPR to “change the narrative of urban ecology by looking at economic growth and development through environment protection.”

The Hindu

Multiple Solutions for a Better Bengaluru

May 18, 2019

The Hindu quotes Sudhir Krishnaswamy on retired bureaucrat V. Balasubramanian’s proposal for a separate Bengaluru Metropolitan Council at the Bengaluru Metropolitan Region level.

Live Mint

Flawed Electoral Roll Inclusion a Likely Reason for Low Voter Turnout in Bengaluru, Chennai

April 19, 2019

Live Mint quotes Sudhir Krishnaswamy in commentary on “abysmal” voter turnout. Points to constituency demarcation and flawed voter roll preparation.

Non-Personal Data: The ‘Economic’ Case for Regulation

July 23, 2020 | Divij Joshi

In the previous post, we introduced the Draft Report of the Committee on Non-Personal Data Regulation and analyzed its conception of ‘Non-Personal Data’ (“NPD”) as a category for regulation. There, we wrote about how the contours of NPD (as defined under the Draft Report) will necessarily entail conflicts with the proposed personal data protection regime in India. In this post, we set out to examine and critique the Committee’s justifications for why ‘Non-Personal Data’ should be regulated, in particular, on the ‘economic value’ justification for regulation.

Regulating Non-Personal Data

July 16, 2020 | Divij Joshi

In September 2019, the Ministry of Information Technology, Government of India, formed a Committee of Experts (“Committee”) to deliberate on the issue of ‘Non-Personal Data’ and to suggest an appropriate regulatory framework for the subject. The Committee’s initial report, (“Draft Report”) was released for public comment on July 12, 2020. In the next few posts, we will summarise, reflect on and critically analyze the concepts presented in the Committee’s report. This post focuses on the concept of ‘non-personal data’ as a category for regulatory efforts under the Draft Report.

A Case of Universal Basic Income Support

July 14, 2020 | Ritambhara Singh

Amid this pandemic crisis and subsequent lockdown, we witnessed images of millions of migrants returning their homes walking hundreds of kilometres. As per data collected by Union Skill Development Ministry, around 67 lakh migrant workers returned to their homes. The predicament of these migrant workers during the crisis could have been significantly averted if they had a financial safety net to rely on – most had lost their jobs after the lock down had come into effect.