A New Deal for City Governments (with Mathew Idiculla)

September 18, 2020 | Mathew Idiculla

Mathew Idiculla talks to host Pavan Srinath about how Indian cities need a new deal in the 2020s, with fresh imagination. Mathew explores the place of city governments in constitutional and legal regimes across the world, and how they are treated within India.

Commercial Courts In India: Three Puzzles For Legal System Reform

September 2, 2020 | Dr. Sudhir Krishnaswamy

In this paper published by the Journal of Indian Law and Society, Dr Sudhir Krishnaswamy…

A Right to the Indian City? Legal and Political claims over housing and urban space in India

August 5, 2020 | Mathew Idiculla

This paper examines the idea of the “Right to the City” as a theoretical concept, and it’s emergence in international law and social movements and explores how it may be realized as a legal and political claim in India.

Re-Imagining Bail Decision Making: An analysis of Bail Practice in Karnataka & Recommendations for Reform

March 30, 2020

The study titled ‘Reimaging Bail Decision Making’ looks at bail decision making in trial courts in three districts in Karnataka – Bengaluru, Dharwad and Tumakuru. The research focuses on the courts, which are the primary site at which decisions on granting bail are made, to understand what guides the grant or non-grant of bail and what are the factors which decide whether bail is likely to be granted or not. These include the statutory basis for the offence, the nature of offence, its classification as bailable or non-bailable, the punishment prescribed and effective legal representation by lawyers.

Child Rights Trust v. Union of India

August 6, 2020 | Almas Shaikh

Child Rights Trust (a Bangalore based NGO working extensively in the area of Child Rights) and Ms. Neena Nayak (a child Rights advocate and activist) filed a Writ Petition seeking enforcement of Fundamental Rights, under Articles 14, 15, 19, 21, 21A, 39 and 47 of the Constitution, of migrant children and children of migrant families during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Petition seeks to ensure that migrant children and children of migrant workers are provided with proper living conditions, nutrition, health care/immunization, access to education and their protection. The Petition highlights that the lack of present-day assessment of the number and essential needs of migrant children, infants and pregnant and lactating women of migrant families has aggravated their vulnerabilities during the lockdown.

The Hindu

Bail protocol, standardisation needed to ease undertrial burden in prisons

June 2, 2020

The Hindu carried a story mentioning CLPR’s study, “Re-imagining bail decision making: An analysis of bail practice in Karnataka and recommendations for reform”. The study emphasizes that bail protocol needs to be standardized and the classification of offenses must be revisited for easing the burden of under-trial prisoners in India.

Mongabay

[Book Review] The stories of our roots

June 20, 2019

In a recent interview about their book, Harini Nagendra and Seema Mundoli speak of joined efforts with colleagues from CLPR to “change the narrative of urban ecology by looking at economic growth and development through environment protection.”

The Hindu

Multiple Solutions for a Better Bengaluru

May 18, 2019

The Hindu quotes Sudhir Krishnaswamy on retired bureaucrat V. Balasubramanian’s proposal for a separate Bengaluru Metropolitan Council at the Bengaluru Metropolitan Region level.

Live Mint

Flawed Electoral Roll Inclusion a Likely Reason for Low Voter Turnout in Bengaluru, Chennai

April 19, 2019

Live Mint quotes Sudhir Krishnaswamy in commentary on “abysmal” voter turnout. Points to constituency demarcation and flawed voter roll preparation.

Privacy Theory 101: Privacy as Contextual Integrity

September 17, 2020 | Divij Joshi

The Right to Privacy has firmly re-established itself in the constitutional lexicon, following the 9-judge decision in KS Puttaswamy v Union of India. The re-emergence of privacy as an area of constitutional interest has no doubt been informed by anxieties about technological developments – particularly digital communication and information technologies. The internet and related technologies have renewed concerns about how information flows can affect fundamental individual and societal interests – articulated as the ‘right to be let alone’, or the right to self-determination, among others. In the next few blogs, we will examine the theoretical constructs of a ‘right to privacy’, its relationship to the right under Indian law, and its implications for information regulation and governance going forward.

Must-Reads: Algorithms and the Law

September 14, 2020 | Divij Joshi

In the last few posts, we posed some questions for algorithms as an artefact for governance, including the implications of different forms of algorithms embedded in computing and information infrastructure, their relationships with governing and administration, and their relevance for specific legal domains. Here, we share some readings to critically study, understand and critique algorithmic systems are particularly relevant for lawyers.