Kruthika R

Research Associate

Kruthika graduated with a B.A. (Hons.) LL.B from School of Law, Christ University in 2017.

Kruthika’s research interests include Indian constitutional and political history, constitutional law and civic citizenship.

Publications

Blog

Fifth edition of ConQuest kicks off online, preliminary results out

October 8, 2020

In this article published by The Print, Kruthika R and Madhavi Gopalakrishnan, Research Associates at CLPR talk about the recently conducted preliminary rounds of the ConQuest 2020 and also discuss a few interesting questions that created a buzz among the students. The article also enlists the results of the preliminary rounds of the ConQuest quiz 2020. 

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ConQuest is back to test your knowledge of the Constitution, and this time it’s going digital

October 8, 2020

In this article published by The Print, Kruthika R and Madhavi Gopalakrishnan, Research Associates at CLPR, talk about the CLPR’s annual flagship quiz ConQuest 2020: 5th edition of India’s premier quiz on the Constitution, history and politics.

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NEP Gets the Language Problem Wrong

September 22, 2020

In this essay published by Socio-Legal Review (SLR), Madhavi and Kruthika, Research Associates at CLPR, argue that English is actually an emancipatory language that is key to socio-economic mobility in India. Further, the essay depicts how the language aspect of the NEP does not fulfil its historical mandate of protecting linguistic minorities and needs to be re-evaluated keeping in mind its outsize impact on disadvantaged students and minorities.

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TRANSFORM 2020 Art Exhibition

November 26, 2020

Centre for Law & Policy Research invites you to the TRANSFORM 2020 Art Exhibition  …

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The Emergence of Algorithmic Bosses: Framing a Legal Response

September 28, 2020

A few months ago, two Uber drivers from the United Kingdom, Azeem Hanif and Alfie Wellcoat filed a case against Uber alleging discrimination by its algorithm. They brought the case in a District Court in Amsterdam, where Uber’s headquarters is located. One of their central claims is that Uber’s algorithmic interference determines the nature of their rides: which drivers get the short ride or the nice ride, and the other way round. The automated decision-making process lacks transparency and is based on arbitrary factors, they allege, and drivers are in the dark about how the AI decides these questions.

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CLPR | Trans Law Quarterly | Issue II

September 7, 2020

    E D I T O R I A L We are still in…

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